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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

WOOD ROT GO AWAY!
Wood windows are basically a maintenance nightmare and with enough time and the right conditions wood rot can destroy wood building products. Occasionally your home screams for attention and you can’t ignore the window rotting off the front of your home, but many times there are major wood rot problems happening below the surface that unfortunately go unnoticed. Wooden windows have a tendency to be a starting point for wood rot and once rot starts it just continues to spread. Wood rot does not discriminate and it will spread very fast. It can quickly extend past the window frames into window sills and brick mold where the water has a tendency to sit longer and not run off. Rain is persistent in Georgia and rot can quickly get out of control and ultimately, if wood rot continues it can compromise your home’s structural integrity. Because of its tendency to spread, wood rot should be repaired ASAP, and it should be repaired completely so it does not come back. If you are thinking this problem sounds familiar, give WINDOWCRAFTERS a call today and let us help! There are many ways to tackle wood rot and our in-home sales consultants can address your specific situation and hopefully help eliminate this problem once and for all
4:36 pm est 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Understanding condensation...
Understanding Condensation
Condensation occurs on windows when warm moist air comes in contact with the colder surface of the window. Although it is natural to assume that the windows are to blame, the fact is that the windows are merely a visible sign that excessive humidity exists in your home. Windows do not cause condensation, and cannot stop it, but new energy efficient windows with LoE glas...s, argon gas fill and warm edge spacer system may help control it.

What Causes Condensation?
Indoor moisture is caused by a variety of factors. Common household activities such as cooking, showering, and doing laundry will - adds moisture to the air. Newer homes often have more condensation than older homes because they are constructed with newer weather tight building materials. Although these never technologies reduce energy consumption, they also reduce air leakage which in turn reduces ventilation. This reduced ventilation actually seals in moisture which increases condensation. Ventilation is the best way to reduce condensation. .

Window Condensation is often temporary and there are many instances when temporary window condensation can occur.

A few include:
•During showers and baths, cooking, dishwashing and other steam-producing occasions.

•Sharp, quick temperature changes, especially when the exterior and interior temperatures vary, can create temporary condensation.

•New construction or remodeling. Building materials contain a great deal of moisture. When the HVAC is turned on, this moisture will pass into the air and settle on the windows and so on. This will usually disappear following one full year.

•During humid summers, houses absorb moisture. This will be especially apparent during the beginning of the summer as your house absorbs some moisture. After a while, your house will be dried out, and the condensation may diminish.

What Can Be Done To Reduce Condensation?
There are many simple steps that can be taken to reduce the humidity level in your home:
•Confirm all ventilation equipment is adjusted properly.
•Use kitchen and bathrooms exhaust fans and air out kitchen, bathroom and laundry room during and after use.
•Make sure attic louvers remain open all year and attic and crawl spaces are properly ventilated.
•Consult a local heating and ventilation contractor to help determine whether ventilation is adequate, if the moisture content in your home is within ran and if anything can be improved upon.
Understanding Condensation
Condensation occurs on windows when warm moist air comes in contact with the colder surface of the window. Although it is natural to assume that the windows are to blame, the fact is that the windows are merely a visible sign that excessive humidity exists in your home. Windows do not cause condensation, and cannot stop it, but new energy efficient windows with LoE glas...s, argon gas fill and warm edge spacer system may help control it.

What Causes Condensation?
Indoor moisture is caused by a variety of factors. Common household activities such as cooking, showering, and doing laundry will - adds moisture to the air. Newer homes often have more condensation than older homes because they are constructed with newer weather tight building materials. Although these never technologies reduce energy consumption, they also reduce air leakage which in turn reduces ventilation. This reduced ventilation actually seals in moisture which increases condensation. Ventilation is the best way to reduce condensation. .

Window Condensation is often temporary and there are many instances when temporary window condensation can occur.

A few include:
•During showers and baths, cooking, dishwashing and other steam-producing occasions.

•Sharp, quick temperature changes, especially when the exterior and interior temperatures vary, can create temporary condensation.

•New construction or remodeling. Building materials contain a great deal of moisture. When the HVAC is turned on, this moisture will pass into the air and settle on the windows and so on. This will usually disappear following one full year.

•During humid summers, houses absorb moisture. This will be especially apparent during the beginning of the summer as your house absorbs some moisture. After a while, your house will be dried out, and the condensation may diminish.

What Can Be Done To Reduce Condensation?
There are many simple steps that can be taken to reduce the humidity level in your home:
•Confirm all ventilation equipment is adjusted properly.
•Use kitchen and bathrooms exhaust fans and air out kitchen, bathroom and laundry room during and after use.
•Make sure attic louvers remain open all year and attic and crawl spaces are properly ventilated.
•Consult a local heating and ventilation contractor to help determine whether ventilation is adequate, if the moisture content in your home is within ran and if anything can be improved upon.
 
5:25 pm est 

Sunday, November 13, 2011

12:02 pm est 

Window Replacement Hold High Value - Over 75% Cost Recouped
South Atlantic — Midrange
2010-11 National Averages
Job CostResale ValueCost RecoupedProjectJob CostResale ValueCost Recouped
$45,591$33,92174.4%Attic Bedroom$51,428$37,14272.2%
$13,575$7,38054.4%Backup Power Generator$14,718$7,13648.5%
$57,627$45,75779.4%Basement Remodel$64,519$45,18670.0%
$36,496$20,11555.1%Bathroom Addition$40,710$21,69553.3%
$15,252$9,95065.2%Bathroom Remodel$16,634$10,66864.1%
$14,844$9,98067.2%Deck Addition (composite)$15,620$10,33766.2%
$9,916$7,67077.3%Deck Addition (wood)$10,973$7,98672.8%
$3,348$2,11763.2%Entry Door Replacement (fiberglass)$3,576$2,14760.0%
$1,098$1,488135.5%Entry Door Replacement (steel)$1,218$1,243102.1%
$76,663$49,91465.1%Family Room Addition$85,740$53,62462.5%
$54,975$34,60162.9%Garage Addition$60,608$35,87659.2%
$1,178$1,07991.6%Garage Door Replacement$1,291$1,08383.9%
$27,223$13,12248.2%Home Office Remodel$28,888$13,23545.8%
$55,004$38,71370.4%Major Kitchen Remodel$58,367$40,12668.7%
$96,845$65,19567.3%Master Suite Addition$108,090$68,14663.0%
$20,762$15,35874.0%Minor Kitchen Remodel$21,695$15,79072.8%
$18,714$12,59067.3%Roofing Replacement$21,488$12,78059.5%
$10,347$7,91776.5%Siding Replacement (vinyl)$11,357$8,22372.4%
$70,099$35,16750.2%Sunroom Addition$75,224$36,54048.6%
$150,485$100,57366.8%Two-Story Addition$165,243$107,33865.0%
$9,965$7,70577.3%Window Replacement (vinyl)$11,066$7,92071.6%
$10,873$8,01173.7%Window Replacement (wood)$12,027$8,70772.4%
South Atlantic — Upscale
2010-11 National Averages
Job CostResale ValueCost RecoupedProjectJob CostResale ValueCost RecoupedChange vs. 2009-10
$71,922$39,31554.7%Bathroom Addition$78,409$41,56253.0%
$49,894$29,98460.1%Bathroom Remodel$53,759$30,73857.2%
$36,620$21,61159.0%Deck Addition (composite)$38,382$22,15457.7%
$82,230$46,07956.0%Garage Addition$90,053$48,27853.6%
$3,445$2,59575.3%Garage Door Replacement$3,545$2,47669.8%
$7,073$4,70366.5%Grand Entrance (fiberglass)$7,700$4,97964.7%
$109,003$66,56061.1%Major Kitchen Remodel$113,464$67,74659.7%
$214,431$119,58555.8%Master Suite Addition$232,062$122,37052.7%
$32,962$20,12161.0%Roofing Replacement$38,022$21,12055.5%
$13,106$11,19785.4%Siding Replacement (fiber-cement)$13,382$10,70780.0%
$12,860$9,77476.0%Siding Replacement (foam-backed vinyl)$13,973$10,11972.4%
$12,878$10,02777.9%Window Replacement (vinyl)$14,284$10,36872.6%
$16,760$11,66769.6%Window Replacement (wood)$18,226$12,30367.5%

Source: Replacement Contractor, Business Update, November 10, 2011
12:02 pm est 

Friday, November 11, 2011

Remodeling projects slow after tax credits expire

Window remodeling projects slow after credits expire

Remodelers feeling the impact of expired tax credits

November 9, 2011

The window business has slowed for many remodelers this year in the wake of the expired tax credits.

That’s according to the latest Professional Remodeler research, which shows that the majority of remodelers are selling fewer windows this year.

Fifty-four percent of remodelers said their window business has declined compared to 2010, while only 18 percent reported an increase in business. That’s in stark contrast to other exterior projects, such as siding, which our research earlier this year showed to be on the upswing, with only 13 percent reporting a decrease in business.

Tax credit impact

That difference seems to be due in large part to the expiration of the $1,500 tax credit at the end of 2010. This year’s smaller credit doesn’t appear to be doing a significant job of driving window work.

“The government tax credit cannibalized future sales,” said a Florida-based exterior remodeler. “Our window business remained consistent plus or minus 10 percent for the past 10 years and is now off 40 percent.”

Fifty-four percent of remodelers said the expiration of the tax credits had decreased their business, although 44 percent said it had no impact on business.

“The expiration of the tax credits is not so much to blame as the tax credits themselves,” said a Wisconsin full-service remodeler. “Either you have perpetual tax credits or never have them. All they do is take away future business for the next one to two years.”

Many remodelers also cited the general downturn in the economy, as well as the new lead paint rules, for the decline in their business this year.

“Cost is always an issue, so increased costs due to EPA rules have reduced the quantity and quality customers are willing to select,” said one remodeler.

“Clients have been looking for less expensive windows with fewer options, and have been phasing their window replacement projects,” said an Ohio full-service remodeler.

Remodelers driving product choice

Remodelers continue to have a major influence over the brands and types of windows that are getting installed.

In fact, 64 percent of remodelers said that their average client relies on them to make all material, style and brand recommendations. Another 19 percent of remodelers said that the average homeowner may have a specific style and material in mind, but they influence the brand. Only 3 percent of remodelers said they have no influence on the brand, material or style when it comes to window installation.

Vinyl and wood are the most common frame materials remodelers are specifying. Vinyl is used by 19 percent of remodelers in all of their projects, while wood is used by 15 percent of remodelers. Seventy-two percent of remodelers use vinyl on at least some projects and 74 percent use wood.

Aluminum, fiberglass and composites are used by a smaller group, with about 60 percent using those materials on some projects. Eight percent of remodelers used aluminum on all their projects, compared to 4 percent who used fiberglass and 2 percent that used composites. Steel frames were used by a much smaller group, with only 22 percent using them on any projects at all.

Energy-efficient features were very popular, with more than 90 percent using at least one such feature on their projects, led by insulated double-pane windows with low-e coatings at 90 percent. More than 60 percent of remodelers used argon- or krypton-filled units over the past year.

9:22 am est 

2017.01.01 | 2011.11.01

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